Category Archives: Social Innovation

Supporting Social Change

Listen to these change makers talk about how Hollyhock has affected them and their work. What are the critical factors that contribute to social change? How has Hollyhock supported you?

Do you have a Hollyhock story to share? Add your stories to the comments below!

Habits and Change

By Dia Penning, originally posted by Love Light Yoga June 7, 2017. Dia will be presenting Yin Yoga and Social Justice  at Hollyhock September 2018. 

My work in social justice and yoga has dovetailed a number of occasions over the last 5 years. More often, I find myself in spaces where we talk about spirit and demonstrate our long held physical tensions as parallels for the tensions in the world. How can one do effective public work if their internal landscape is a mess?

Justice is not, strictly, an external concept.  As we continue to examine normalized violence and our collective capacity for self-harm and dishonesty, the sickness in our world becomes much more sharp.

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Facilitation is Not a Dark Art

By Julian Griggs, IAF certified facilitator, who will be presenting Alchemy of Group Facilitation in Vancouver on Nov 20-22, 2017.

“Organizing is what you do before you do something, so that when you do it, it is not all mixed up.” – A.A. Milne

“Could you facilitate this meeting, please? Here’s a flipchart marker.”

For some people, this invitation marks their first adventure into the world of group facilitation. It is an invitation to leap in to an unfamiliar situation, often under the scrutiny of peers, and with little or no preparation. The scope of responsibility implied is ambiguous, although there is some expectation that the facilitator is a kind of ‘servant leader’—whatever that confusing term may mean.

‘Drop in’ facilitation of this type is uncomfortable and highly challenging, particularly for facilitation novices. This approach also reflects an assumption—that facilitation is a mysterious, mercurial role, practiced ‘on the fly’, characterized by brilliant interventions and enlightened guidance, which somehow enables a group to operate at its best.

I think that assumption is false and misleading.

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Grassroots Activism Starts at Home

By Dan Hines, originally published by Communities Magazine on Oct 11, 2016. Dan will be presenting Journey Towards Wholeness: A Courage & Renewal® Retreat at Hollyhock in Sept 2017.

You need only claim the events of your life to make yourself yours. When you truly possess all you have been and done…you are fierce with reality.
– Florida Scott-Maxwell, The Measure of My Days

I am unsure how fierce with reality I have truly become!

Yet I have found inspiration from these hopeful words: to be more daring in claiming the events of my life. Indeed, I can recognize a slowly emerging fierceness within me. I can begin to see more clearly the interaction between my experiences of living within intentional community, my work and travels, and of the growing activism and engagement in political life.

It has been easier in the past to consider and share about these areas of life in isolation from each other. This wider perspective is a new discovery.

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Leadership and Money

By Tracy Theemes, who will be presenting Money Mindfulness at Hollyhock in August 2017.

I recently spoke to a group of mid-career female professionals about leadership, power and money.

This group was knowledgeable, courageous and focused. Talking about leadership was easy – we revere it, fund organizations dedicated to it, write books about it. It’s the holy grail of discussion topics. When we discuss leadership, good and evil, morality and values, everyone puts on their happy face.

But when we got into the areas of power and money, things got tense.

I asked them this question: “If you had unlimited power, what would you do with it? Take a few minutes and write down your ideas”…

They began to twitch. Half of this group, for instance, dismissed the idea out of hand, saying, essentially, no thanks. The notion of power had them running for the hills. Other answers were general in scope. I’d abolish world hunger. I’d eliminate fossil fuel use. I’d educate every person in the world.

There is often a disconnect between leadership, power and money, but if you have unlimited power, you can access money. All resources are available to you.

So, then I posed the question, “If you had unlimited money, what would you do?”

The answers ranged from looking after friends and family to buying a planet. These are not so much real objectives as they are dreams, hopes and to a large degree, fantasies.

With this experiment, three things became apparent:

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