Tag Archives: Trauma

Sing, Act, Dance, Heal: Creative Arts Therapy Can Open New Pathways of Wellness, Connection, and Joy

By Wendy Kagan, via Chronogram
Featured Image Source: Otago Daily Times
T
his article features B
essel van der Kolk, MD who will be presenting Trauma, Body, and the Brain: Restoring the Capacity for Rhythm and Play at Hollyhock on August 14-19, 2016.

In January 2011, a 9mm bullet, fired point-blank from the gun of a mentally ill assailant, passed through the left rear of Gabrielle Giffords’s head and exited just over her left eye. The Arizona congresswoman, who had been meeting with constituents in front of a supermarket near Tucson, would survive—despite massive trauma to the left side of her brain, the regions that control vision, movement, and speech. After surgery and intensive therapy, some 10 months later Giffords could respond to TV journalist Diane Sawyer’s interview questions with mostly one-word answers—yet she could sing all the lyrics of “Tomorrow” from the Broadway show “Annie.” Struggling to find language, she would call a chair a “spoon,” but she could belt out all the words to Cyndi Lauper’s “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun.” It was music that helped pave a road back to speech, and it was music that—in the form of a guitar-strumming therapist by her side to help organize her movements—even supported Giffords’s steps as she relearned how to walk.

“Drama, song, writing, and other expressive activities are more effective than talk therapy.”

Continue reading Sing, Act, Dance, Heal: Creative Arts Therapy Can Open New Pathways of Wellness, Connection, and Joy

Why You Should Write a Letter to Yourself Tonight

By , M.D. via The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma and published in NYMAG
Feature Photo Credit: Shutterstock
Join Bessel at Hollyhock for Trauma, Body, and the Brain: Restoring the Capacity for Rhythm and Play on August 14-19, 2016.

Most of us have poured out our hearts in angry, accusatory, plaintive, or sad letters after people have betrayed or abandoned us. Doing so almost always makes us feel better, even if we never send them. When you write to yourself, you don’t have to worry about other people’s judgment — you just listen to your own thoughts and let their flow take over. Later, when you reread what you wrote, you often discover surprising truths.

As functioning members of society, we’re supposed to be “cool” in our day-to-day interactions and subordinate our feelings to the task at hand. When we talk with someone with whom we don’t feel completely safe, our social editor jumps in on full alert and our guard is up. Writing is different. If you ask your editor to leave you alone for a while, things will come out that you had no idea were there. You are free to go into a sort of a trance state in which your pen (or keyboard) seems to channel whatever bubbles up from inside. You can connect those self-observing and narrative parts of your brain without worrying about the reception you’ll get. Continue reading Why You Should Write a Letter to Yourself Tonight

NeurosculptingⓇ with Lisa Wimberger

According to the Centre d’etudes ethniques des universities montrealaises,  40.4% of Canadians pray or meditate on their own weekly.  Yet many people still find meditation to be a challenging and elusive practice. Lisa Wimberger’s goal is to make meditative practices accessible and easy, while still being effective and impactful.

Lisa Wimberger has innovated modern meditation utilizing the latest research in neuroscience as an answer to bring deep healing to victims of trauma.  Based on thirty years of experience in various forms of meditation, Wimberger developed NeurosculptingⓇ as a way to heal herself from seizures where conventional medicine had failed.

Continue reading NeurosculptingⓇ with Lisa Wimberger