Tag Archives: social enterprise

Social Venture Institute Impact Bio: Christopher Roy

Via Junxion

“If you’re conscious at all about what’s going on in the world and the changes that are needed, it’s obvious to me that business has a tremendous role to play in the transformation to a more equitable, social and environmental world.”

That’s what gets Christopher Roy out of bed every morning. Christopher runs Marketworks, his own consulting agency that provides digital marketing for a growing number of businesses that consider societal benefits, social change and environmental sustainability to be essential parts of their business offering. His clients are the kinds of enterprises that are doing business differently, operating more in relationship with the natural world, lead by people putting social and environmental benefits ahead of profit. “That’s pretty powerful to me,” he says, with a wise twinkle in his eye.

Continue reading Social Venture Institute Impact Bio: Christopher Roy

Social Venture Institute Impact Bio: Mary Waldner

via Junxion 

Mary Waldner had been sick most of her life without knowing why. When she was finally diagnosed with Celiac disease in 1994, it was a life-changing relief—and was soon to be the ‘aha moment’ that sparked an entrepreneurial journey.

“I developed a cracker recipe for myself so that I could have something to eat, especially when going out. And then I saw other people eating them and I watched how much they loved them!”

So in 2004, not knowing she was going to hit the wave of consciousness that was beginning to sweep the food industry and consumers, Mary launched her company. Since then, poetically, “it’s taken off like crazy!” Today, Mary’s Gone Crackers ships its  organic and vegan crackers, cookies and pretzels across the US from their plant in California, and north to Canada. Continue reading Social Venture Institute Impact Bio: Mary Waldner

A Film About Disrupting the Business Quo

via instituteB

“NOT BUSINESS AS USUAL” – A Film About Disrupting the Business Quo

It was the promise of something better…

A better life for your family, a better start for your business, a better legacy to leave the world. Founded on the virtues of hard work, equal opportunity and a free market economy.

But somewhere between the dreaming, and the making, and the buying, and the selling – we were duped. And we’re just now beginning to realize how badly.

Not Business As Usual is a provocative look at capitalism as envisioned by Nobel Prize winner Milton Friedman, the most influential economist of the late 20th century. The film explores why he only measured success by one metric: Greed. And how that narrow view has resulted in environmental destruction, human rights abuses and ironically enough, unsustainable business practices.

This feature length documentary tracks the changing landscape of business with the rising tide of conscious capitalism and features the inspiring stories of several subversive entrepreneurs from Vancouver who are redefining what it means to be successful.

The film features a number of Hollyhock conference producers, including Joel Solomon (also board chair), Mike Rowlands, Denise Taschereau, and Madeleine Shaw.

Our People ~ Jill Earthy

“My experience with Hollyhock programs consistently equates to meaningful connections and intense learning through the power of collaboration and community.  Amazing!” – Jill

Jill Earthy, an SVI alumni who plans on attending SVI Women in Vancouver is one of the many inspiring changemakers supported by the Hollyhock Scholarship Fund. She is the BC Director of The Canadian Youth Business Foundation, an organization that champions youth entrepreneurship in Canada and around the world.

 

SUPPORT YOUR FAVOURITE CHANGEMAKER this month.
Contact danielle@hollyhock.ca for more details.

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via Business In Vancouver

Life Lessons: Jill Earthy
by Emma Crawford

Jill Earthy discovered long ago that engaging different perspectives can be a fundamental part of decision-making, and she has since surrounded herself with a strong network she can turn to when she needs to reach out.

But the regional director in charge of B.C. and the Yukon for the Canadian Youth Business Foundation recently realized that getting different opinions is not the only reason it’s helpful to consult with others.

Until this past spring, Earthy was working as the Forum for Women Entrepreneurs’ executive director. She decided it was time for a change and started considering her different options, which included starting her own business – something she had done successfully twice before.

“There was one point in my decision-making where I was pursuing a few different things, and I thought I had made a decision one way,” she recalled. “It was somebody’s perspective of my physical reaction that made me rethink that.”

Earthy said that as she was discussing her options with others in her support network, more than one person identified a distinct difference in how she spoke about each one.

“I had it happen two or three times, where someone would say ‘When you were talking about this one opportunity, your face lit up. When you were talking about the other, you looked pained.’”

Earthy, a past Business in Vancouver Forty under 40 award winner, added that the difference in how she reacted to the various options was apparent to others but not to her.

“It’s amazing how you give off certain signals that you don’t realize. I found that was quite eye-opening for me.”

Earthy said that new body-language information helped her decide to take the position at the Canadian Youth Business Foundation, which was not the choice she had originally been leaning toward.

She said she’s now paying closer attention to the body language of others and is more aware of visual cues that others give off – which works well in her new position working with young entrepreneurs.

“I think sometimes we convince ourselves that one way is the right answer, and sometimes it’s for the wrong reasons.”