Tag Archives: brain

Expanding Our Understanding of Love

By Constance Kellough, who will be presenting Innerbody Meditation at Hollyhock on July 12-16, 2017.

Walkway to the Sanctuary meditation room at Hollyhock

There are many different meditation practices originating from various spiritual and secular traditions.  Most, however, stress the importance of quieting the compulsive thinking mind, which wanders on average 50 times in 5 minutes.  This on-going thinking (which is often unsettling, non- productive and not related to what we are experiencing in the present moment) usually emanates from some level of egoic fear and pulls us into the past or into the future.

So instead, we may crave to experience blessed stillness.  Why?  Because stillness is our natural state; it’s our essential self.

Stillness rises on its own when there is no thought.  Eckhart Tolle has said, “Stillness is the language God speaks.”

So how does stillness relate to love? It has been said, “Be still and know that I am God.”  Because God is love, one could also say, “Be still and know that I am love.”

When two people are authentically themselves in a state of stillness (some call it “presence”) with one another, they are in a state of love.

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Sing, Act, Dance, Heal: Creative Arts Therapy Can Open New Pathways of Wellness, Connection, and Joy

By Wendy Kagan, via Chronogram
Featured Image Source: Otago Daily Times
T
his article features B
essel van der Kolk, MD who will be presenting Trauma, Body, and the Brain: Restoring the Capacity for Rhythm and Play at Hollyhock on August 14-19, 2016.

In January 2011, a 9mm bullet, fired point-blank from the gun of a mentally ill assailant, passed through the left rear of Gabrielle Giffords’s head and exited just over her left eye. The Arizona congresswoman, who had been meeting with constituents in front of a supermarket near Tucson, would survive—despite massive trauma to the left side of her brain, the regions that control vision, movement, and speech. After surgery and intensive therapy, some 10 months later Giffords could respond to TV journalist Diane Sawyer’s interview questions with mostly one-word answers—yet she could sing all the lyrics of “Tomorrow” from the Broadway show “Annie.” Struggling to find language, she would call a chair a “spoon,” but she could belt out all the words to Cyndi Lauper’s “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun.” It was music that helped pave a road back to speech, and it was music that—in the form of a guitar-strumming therapist by her side to help organize her movements—even supported Giffords’s steps as she relearned how to walk.

“Drama, song, writing, and other expressive activities are more effective than talk therapy.”

Continue reading Sing, Act, Dance, Heal: Creative Arts Therapy Can Open New Pathways of Wellness, Connection, and Joy