Category Archives: Wisdom Teachings

Padma Meditation

By Padma Shyam, who will be presenting Padma Meditation: Finding Balance and Joy at Hollyhock in September.

Namaste! I live in the Himalayan mountains, and over the last thirty years, I’ve learned from my guru and through my own daily meditation that we are, each one of us, pure and free and forever blessed.

For years I’ve practiced breath exercises and gentle hatha yoga, eaten a pure vegetarian diet, and every single day, taken the time to meditate.

I’ve found that the single most powerful technique you can do, is the very simple act of sitting down and closing your eyes each day.

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Moving into the Unknown

By Kristen Scholfield-Sweet, from The Journey Oracle Blog, who will be presenting Moving in the Unknown with Ann Mortifee at Hollyhock in  August 23-27, 2017.

Ann Mortifee and I are teaching a session at Hollyhock, on Cortes Island this August titled Moving into the Unknown.  But before we can intend to move into the unknown and experience the Mystery, we must first believe it is possible to do so.  How do I know that I am developing a relationship with the unseen forces of nature, and the creatures who inhabit the other-than-human world?  Here are three examples from my daily life.

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Time of Transition

Atum O’Kane
Time of Transition
July 2-7, 2017

A Buddhist Valentine

By Lama Surya Das, who will be presenting  Make Me One with Everything in Vancouver on Sept 24, 2017.

Valentine’s Day is one of my favorite American holidays. The fact
that this over-commercialized day falls around the same time as Tibetan New Year reminds me to make new year’s resolutions relating to my loved ones, and to renew my commitment to cultivating warm empathetic, altruistic compassion and unselfish goodness of heart, the very essence of authentic love. These resolutions usually involve opening my heart and mind; listening better; learning to forgive and love even those I don’t like; and coming to accept and bless the world, rather than fighting with it or trying to escape from it. Through co-meditating with everything, as it appears; through intermeditation and interbeing with it–rather than against or apart from “it”– I am learning to see thru the illusion of separateness. I also remember groups and individuals who may not feel included in this so-called lovers’ day in our country,  including single people and the LGBTQ+ communities. As Zen Master Dogen says: “To study the Buddha Way is to be intimate with all things.” This is true love.

What is true love? How would Buddha love? By seeing every single being, human and otherwise, as fundamentally like himself, and thus able to treat them and love them in the way he or she would be treated. We call this infinitely benevolent, selfless love the invaluable Bodhicitta or the Awakened Heart, the very spirit and soul of enlightenment. One can find this taught elegantly in the “Loving-kindness Sutra”; in Shantideva’s classic “The Way of the Bodhisattva“; in Atisha’s “Seven Points of Mind-Training & Attitude Transformation,” and in The Good Book.

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Expanding Our Understanding of Love

By Constance Kellough, who will be presenting Innerbody Meditation at Hollyhock on July 12-16, 2017.

Walkway to the Sanctuary meditation room at Hollyhock

There are many different meditation practices originating from various spiritual and secular traditions.  Most, however, stress the importance of quieting the compulsive thinking mind, which wanders on average 50 times in 5 minutes.  This on-going thinking (which is often unsettling, non- productive and not related to what we are experiencing in the present moment) usually emanates from some level of egoic fear and pulls us into the past or into the future.

So instead, we may crave to experience blessed stillness.  Why?  Because stillness is our natural state; it’s our essential self.

Stillness rises on its own when there is no thought.  Eckhart Tolle has said, “Stillness is the language God speaks.”

So how does stillness relate to love? It has been said, “Be still and know that I am God.”  Because God is love, one could also say, “Be still and know that I am love.”

When two people are authentically themselves in a state of stillness (some call it “presence”) with one another, they are in a state of love.

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