Category Archives: Cortes Programs

Hippies and Capitalists Come Together

Have you ever been a part of a group when everything seemed to click? When everything just came together and you achieved positive outcomes that you hardly believed possible?  It’s a pretty rare and special gem isn’t it?  For most of us, we have had only a mere handful of these experiences, seemingly as a fluke, but we yearn to recreate similar situations.  With good intentions we try to have all our group and team experiences achieve such success, but the process and outcomes often fall short of what seemed possible at the outset.  Reluctantly, we have come to understand that there are a great many hurdles in group work, many of which we face blindly.  For many of us, it seems, if we want to realize the full potential of a group, there must be an “Art & Craft” to it.

Julian Griggs’ program, “The Art & Craft of Effective Group Facilitation”, will provide you with the tools and techniques to bring people together across lines of differences, and help them collaborate to achieve the outcomes they care about.  Most of us are promoted into the role of facilitators because of strong leadership skills or our breadth of knowledge, but few of us have been trained to support collaboration or to bring the very best out of a team.

Griggs_JulianJulian has over 25 years of experience of doing just this, with a strong focus on bringing conservationists, First Nations groups, the resource industry, various levels of government and communities together to foster dialogue and to identify solutions that address each group’s needs.  He has worked behind the scenes supporting groups working in coalition to protect the Great Bear Rainforest, served as the facilitator for the the Muskwa Kechika Advisory Board, has assisted in the formation and work of the North Nations Alliance, and is currently involved in brokering dialogue related to energy and climate, to name just a few of his projects.  The 5-day program he teaches offers a unique small group training environment, allowing for individual coaching targeting each student’s learning needs, with lots of opportunities for hands on exercises, case studies and role plays.  Julian is internationally accredited as a Certified Professional Facilitator, and his program will provide you with the practical tools and knowledge to help your own group or collaborative process deliver on its promise. dovetailconsulting.com

Join Julian for his program, The Art & Craft of Effective Group Facilitation, at Hollyhock on Cortes, May 29 – June 2, 2013

Can Eating Enoki Mushrooms Lower Your Cancer Risk?

BY PAUL STAMETS via The Huffington Post

Paul_Stamets_EnokiEnoki mushrooms, a tasty variety commonly sold in grocery stores, were one of the first mushrooms studied for preventing cancer. Credit for discovering this medical benefit goes in large part to Dr. Tetsuro Ikekawa, a former epidemiologist at the Research Institute of the National Cancer Center in Tokyo, Japan. He wondered why the cancer rates in the Nagano Prefecture of Japan were abnormally low from 1972-1986, compared to surrounding provinces. Ikekawa found it was the center of enoki mushroom cultivation. A cluster within the population of Nagano died less frequently from cancer: enoki mushroom growers and their families. Since many enoki farmers gave their employees the bruised or blemished mushrooms that were deemed unattractive to shoppers, these Nagano citizens ate far more enoki mushrooms than their neighbors. Dr. Ikekawa surmised that their higher rate of enoki mushroom consumption correlated with the lower cancer death rate in Nagano Prefecture.

Paul_Stamets_Enoki_Stats

 

At the time of the research, the average cancer death rate in the Nagano prefecture was 160 per 100,000. This rate dropped to 97 per 100,000, comparatively, in families of enoki growers (Ikekawa, et al,,1989, 2003). Men’s cancer deaths decreased by 36.6 percent, and women in this cluster benefited from a 42.7 percent decrease in mortality from cancer. The population base in this study was around 175,000 people and was age-adjusted. By contrast, the United States currently records 173 deaths from cancer per 100,000 as of 2009 (The Henry J. Kaiser Foundation).

While there are no clusters of enoki growers and enoki eaters to study in the U.S. like there are in Nagano, this Japanese study could inspire epidemiologists to study the effect of higher mushroom consumption. Such research could support the widespread theory held by many mycologists and physicians that increased mushroom consumption can lower cancer fatality rates.

Dr. Ikekawa’s 1989 epidemiological study published by the Nagano Prefectural Research Institute of Rural Industry corroborated years of lab-scale research by Dr. Ikekawa and others. In a flurry of medical research — sparked in part by Ikekawa’s1969 article in Cancer Research on the cancer-fighting properties of many gourmet mushrooms — Japanese researchers sought to isolate, purify, and identify the constituents in enoki mushrooms that provided the anti-cancer effects. Their research focused on two classes of protein-bound polysaccharides: FVP (as in Flammulina velutipes polysaccharides, such as EA6), and FVE (for Flammulina velutipes extracts). As a result of this research, two new compounds — flammulin and proflamin — were isolated. Proflamin is a glycoprotein, containing more than 90 percent protein and less than 10 percent carbohydrate with a molecular weight between 13,000-17,000 Da. Notably, this molecule is orders of magnitude lighter than the heavy beta glucan polysaccharides. Comparative tests of proflamin showed better immune mitigated, cancer-fighting activity against melanoma and other cancers than the well-known PSK isolated from turkey tail (Trametes versicolor) mushrooms. (Ikekawa, et al., 1985).

In 2009, the journal Immunology published a study showing that ingesting enoki extracts containing these substances significantly improved survival rates of mice infected with Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), a leading cause of cervical cancer. Two sets of mice were infected with the HPV oncovirus, and one set was given an extract of enoki mushrooms.

Tumor protection assays showed that 60 percent of mice co-immunized with HPV-16 E7 plus Fve, as compared with 20 percent of those immunized only with HPV-16 E7, remained tumour-free for up to 167 days after challenge with the tumour cells.
The positive immune reactions were augmented from expansion of HPV specific interferon (IFN)-gamma-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes cells (Ding et. al., 2009). In a later study by Yin et al. (2010), Chinese researchers found that three unique beta glucans found in enoki mushrooms (beta-linked glucose, galactose, mannose and fucose sugars) induced a significant increase in cellular nitric oxide expression from murine peritoneal macrophages. Nitric oxide production by immune cells is one of the key mechanisms that our bodies use to destroy diseased cells. Enhancement of these types of immune responses is seen consistently with many medicinal mushrooms that have been tested by cancer researchers.

Nutritional Properties
Enoki mushrooms are a rich source of important nutrients (Stamets, 2005). Our analysis showed that for every 100 grams (dry weight), enoki offers:

  • 346 calories
  • 53 percent carbohydrates (31 percent complex carbohydrates, 22 percent other sugars)
  • 26 percent protein
  • 26 percent dietary fiber
  • 3 percent fat (1.0 gram polyunsaturated, 1.2 grams total unsaturated, 0.23 grams saturated)
  • Significant quantities of many vitamins and minerals: 0.35 mg thiamine, 10.9 mg pantothenic acid (B5), 61 mg niacin, 1.69 mg riboflavin, 14 mg calcium, 0.61 mg copper, 8.3 mg iron, 3,100 mg potassium, 54 µg selenium, and 19 mg sodium.

Read the full article here.

Paul_StametsPaul Stamets is founder of Fungi Perfecti, and was named by Utne Reader magazine as one of the Top Fifty visionaries in 2008. He has pioneered many innovations in the cultivation and use of edible and medicinal mushrooms. He is the author of The Mushroom Cultivator,Growing Gourmet and Medicinal Mushrooms, and Mycelium Running: How Mushrooms Can Help Save the Worldwww.fungi.com

 

Join Paul Stamets at Hollyhock, on Cortes Island, for “Mushrooms: Wild & Mysterious”, Oct 23-27, 2013.

Kinobe's Triple Bottom Line

Kinobe shares his inspiration behind his music, society and the natural environment:

kinobe2Born and raised in Uganda on the shores of the life giving Lake Victoria, Kinobe has worked with musicians across Africa, Europe, Canada, and North America offering workshops sharing the beautiful instruments and rich traditions of African music. He has traveled across Africa to study, teach, and perform alongside some of the finest percussionists on the continent today. He is a gifted drummer who has mastered the various rhythms and techniques of East and West African drumming. kinobemusic.com

 

Shenandoah

by Robert Genn

My daughter, Sara, and I have recently been listening closely to the music of our friend Rhiannon. The timeless old folk song, “Shenandoah,” is a particular favourite. So one beautiful evening, when my assistant Samantha and I had a few hours to spare, we set about making a short video using the song. It’s a sentimental tale about a young man who must depart from the daughter of an Indian chief. The video’s a bit self-indulgent but, as in the act of plein air painting, a sense of timelessness overcame us as we lingered together on the lonely river.

Robert_GennRobert Genn, celebrated painter and author of the phenomenal Twice Weekly Letters, is one of Canada’s most important living masters, with a career spanning over 5 decades. His writings on art comprise one of the largest bodies of writing on the subject by one author, benevolently reaching artists across the globe. painterskeys.com

Join Robert and his daughter Sara, at Hollyhock on Cortes, for Painting: From Plein-Air to Abstraction, August 14 – 18, 2013

Dreamtime Didjeridu – Shine Edgar & Zach Sukuweh – May 31st

The didjeridu (Yidaki) is one of the oldest known instruments in the world, perfect for soloists, musical accompaniment, or meditation. The technique of circular breathing allows a continuous note to be played, inducing a trance on the player and the listener while facilitating healing and spiritual awareness. Learn a variety of sound healing techniques as you play and receive healing treatments. Delve into traditional and contemporary rhythms, harmonics and vocalizing with the didjeridu. One-on-one instruction, ensemble, and solo playing serve all levels of experience.

Watch Shine Edgar in this short clip:

Enter into the powerful earthly sound of the Australian Aboriginal didjeridu this May. Deepen your awareness of the breath, voice and expression unique to your body as you listen in and create your own rhythms. Read more….