Category Archives: Cortes Programs

The 5 Elements of the Cuban Spirit

By Chen Lizra, who will be presenting The Power of the Cuban Spirit on May 19 – 24, 2017 at Hollyhock.

In today’s world we are seeing crumbling values and a loss of our core as human beings. As we look around, many world leaders, but not all, don’t set a good example anymore. They have stopped being role models we care to live up to. The problem is that seeing and feeling this change causes many to lose hope. We need hope to be happy and to feel a certain magic. Life is meant to be lived with a little ‘je ne sais quoi.’

On top of this, we chase careers, fulfillment, owning a house, cars, raising kids and giving them a comfortable future, we want more and more, but with that more comes a sacrifice. We get addicted to the race, to the stress, to doing without knowing anymore how to stop. Does it really make us happy? Are we really satisfied with life? Do we know how to really enjoy the journey and not just the end goal?

I’ve been traveling back and forth forImage result for chen lizra work to Cuba since 2005. Cuba
is a country that did not follow society’s trajectory, model of the Western World and capitalism. As such it became a case study and a human laboratory for alternative living, connecting and enjoying life. When visiting Cuba there is a certain magic you feel that can’t be explained. And it’s not just because you are on a holiday.

So what is this magic? What are its components? And can they be learned and can work anywhere?

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“Oneness” Lost Sock Project

Video by Lori Goldberg, who will be presenting Painting Beyond the Ordinary at Hollyhock on Aug 27 – Sept 1, 2017.

Last September Lori Goldberg participated in an Artist Residency in New York city. She created a Public art project titled ‘ONENESS’ Lost Sock Project. It was a collaborative project to celebrate our diversity and to create connections. Check out the video below and learn more about the project on Lori’s blog.

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Awakening Genius (Podcast)

By Mark Matousek, who will be presenting Writing to Awaken: Memoir as a Path of Transformation at Hollyhock on August 18-23, 2017.

Each of us is born with a unique gift, an authentic voice waiting to be heard. Regardless of the work you do–artist or housewife, bus driver or entrepreneur–this creative power is your genius. Once you learn to tap into this power, and tell the truth about who you are, your life can be transformed. Find your connection between desire, creativity, and spirituality, and how together they can be forces of productivity, self-awareness, and transformation.

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Triple Twined Finish

By Marlene Liddle, who will be presenting Weaving from the Wild with Amy Robertson at Hollyhock on May 15-19, 2017.

No automatic alt text available.Marlene Liddle was born in Haida Gwaii and comes from a long line of artists, including Isabel and Charles Edenshaw.

Click on this photo for step by step instructions from Marlene on how to do a triple twined finish.

 

Check out some of Marlene’s inspiring work below!

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My Crow Self

By Shaena Lambert, who will be presenting Going Under the Words: Creating Fiction and Memoir at Hollyhock on June 2-7, 2017. This essay originally appeared in Quill and Quire, December, 2013, The Last Word, and was reprinted in The Huffington Post.

Margaret Atwood says in Negotiating with the Dead that writers are like jackdaws (a European crow): “We steal the shiny bits and build them into the structures of our own disorderly nests.” 

Collecting these shiny bits is an integral part of the fiction writer’s craft, but most writers, including me, are somewhat shamefaced and ambivalent about the process. What if these bits are woven out of other people’s secrets? Or pieces of skeleton from the family closet?  There’s an almost physical urge to use the material that speaks to you, especially once it starts to grow on its own, putting out twitching root hairs, but you don’t want to expose or hurt other people.

Nadine Gordimer’s famous solution was ‘to write as though everyone you know is dead.’ But few writers have the chutzpah to do this, or the moral certainty. For most writers, collecting material has a more secretive, illicit quality. It is gathered in the dark, kept under wraps, then released, with a mixture of pride and guilt, in what one hopes is a sufficiently transmogrified form.

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