All posts by Marketing Manager

What is Qi Gong? (Video)

By Dr. Aung who will be presenting Aung Medical Qi Gong & Intuition at Hollyhock.

Image result for aung qi gongQi Gong is an ancient form of exercise and healing that focuses on breathing concentration and energy flow. The Chinese word Qi is formally defined as “breathing/air”, but can also be used in the context of describing the relationship between matter, energy and spirit. The dictionary definition for the word “Gong” is that of achievement or results. The two words are combined to describe a method of energy cultivation.

There are many forms and styles of Qi Gong originating from different segments within Chinese society.

Dr. Steven AungDr. Steven K.H. Aung is a pioneer in the integration of western, traditional Chinese and complementary medicine. His efforts have helped to make Alberta and Canada an active centre in the field of integrated and complementary medicine. His unique approach to medicine, combined with the remarkable compassion he brings to all that he does, has made him a highly respected teacher, researcher and physician. He been a geriatric and family physician, and a traditional Chinese medical (TCM) practitioner and teacher for more than thirty years. He has taught medical Qi Gong to thousands of people around the world, and is a clinical professor in the departments of Medicine and Family Medicine at the University of Alberta. In 2006, he was appointed to the Order of Canada.

Dr. Aung will be teaching Aung Medical Qi Gong & Intuition at Hollyhock on July 13-16, 2017.

Register Now!

 

Honey Kissed Hazelnut Bran Muffins

By Heidi Scheifley from Hollyhock: Garden to Table

Bran muffins shouldn’t be something you eat just because they’re good for you. The addition of ground hazelnuts adds a subtle nutty taste, but more than anything, they help create a moistness that is lacking in most bran muffins. A perfect vehicle for a slathering of butter and a smear of homemade blackberry or banana jam.

Ingredients – Makes 12

  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 1 cup plain yogurt
  • 1/2 cup butter, melted and cooled slightly
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 2 tbsp blackstrap molasses
  • 1-1/2 cups wheat bran
  • 1/2 cup ground roasted hazelnuts*
  • 1 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1/4 cup cane sugar
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp ground nutmeg
  • 1 cup dried fruit or 1 cup fresh or frozen berries, optional

Continue reading Honey Kissed Hazelnut Bran Muffins

Recipe: Almond Cranberry Thumbprint Cookies

This recipe is from our Garden to Table cookbook and created by  author and Chef Moreka Jolar.
Our favourite is Cranberry-Orange Sauce (see recipe below), but these cookies can be a vehicle for any of your preserves. You can’t go wrong…strawberry-rhubarb, ginger-peach, blueberry, blackberry, raspberry, apple butter, marmalade… Time to get some of that dusty canning off the shelf and give it new life.

Raising the Roof: Support Our Greenhouse!

After decades of service, the garden greenhouse is ready for retirement and replacement.

Most of you know how it feels to step into the Lodge at meal time—to smell and savour the incredible food that grows outside in the garden and the greenhouse. Will you help Hollyhock by supporting this project?

Continue reading Raising the Roof: Support Our Greenhouse!

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Carry Me,’ by Peter Behrens

The narrator in Peter Behrens’s 2011 novel “The O’Briens” speaks of “a restless instinct in the family, an appetite for geography and change.” The German couple at the center of his new novel, “Carry Me,” share a similar, near-mystical pull toward the American landscape they read about in their youth. “In my most daring ­fantasies,” Billy writes decades later of the woman he loved, “she and I were riding across boundless open country together, Texas or New Mexico, under wide blue sky.” This yearning sounds through the novel’s pages like a refrain, and it will deliver Billy Lange and Karin ­Weinbrenner, though not wholly intact, from the terror of Kristallnacht to the untamed promise of the American West.

PeterBehrensOf Irish-German extract, Billy’s an outsider wherever he finds himself. He knows suspicion and discrimination as a boy in Ireland and England, where his German father was interned during World War I. Now in Frankfurt in 1938, Billy works for the export sales department at the chemical firm IG Farben. He is an observant and deferential narrator for the most part, and in love with Karin, the daughter of a wealthy Jewish industrialist for whom his father has worked for decades. Karin’s distant and oblique presence haunts him; she is perhaps lesbian and, Behrens hints, quite possibly in love with a popular female scriptwriter in Berlin.

When Billy gets Karin pregnant, the prospect of bringing “one more ­German” and “some sort of Jew” into the world weighs on them. “We were jumpy from doubts, fears, dreams of America, the prospect of ourselves as parents.” Structured around the autumn of 1938 as they organize passage to America, the narrative wanders back in time to excavate lengthy tracts of family history that hobble the novel’s pacing a bit. (Archival documents loaded between sections, said to be housed in “Special Collections, McGill Library, McGill University,” seem especially adrift, uncommented on as they are by a narrator who is in a position these many years later to offer analysis and context.) But the weeks leading into Kristallnacht tighten the focus, and it’s here that Billy becomes a fully engaged protagonist. Karin’s father, trapped in a coma after being set upon by a gang of thugs, is the last obstacle between the lovers and their dream of the American West. Only a terrible act of mercy will guarantee their freedom.

Behrens captures his narrator’s naïveté and the casual anti-Semitism of the times with great skill and intelligence. Billy remembers that in the years before the full catastrophe of the age pronounced itself, “we were mostly concerned with ourselves, each of us with sex, love, loneliness probably foremost in our minds.” Contrasts expose striking truths. When he witnesses a Hitler rally in Heidelberg on the same day he loses his virginity to a prostitute, his mind is not focused on momentous historical pronouncements. He’s a kid who’s just scored, after all. “After the first 10 minutes or so I gave up trying to listen. I tuned Herr Hitler out, watched bats fluttering around the rafters, scanned the crowd for my companions and daydreamed exciting sex with Lilly.” As he stares into the eyes of history he sees, instead of portent and impending chaos, little more than his own yearnings, which seems to me as true an observation about human nature as there is.

Screen Shot 2016-02-11 at 2.24.22 PMJoin Peter Behrens for Memory & Myth: Transforming Personal History October 14 – 19, 2016.