All posts by Marketing Coordinator

Finding Your Calling ~ Interview with Adam Bucko

via ShambhalaTimes.org

photo credit: Tim Good: Photography by Tiwago via photopin cc

photo credit: Tim Good: Photography by Tiwago via photopin ccAdam Bucko is an activist, spiritual director to many of New York City’s homeless youth, and co-author of a new award-winning book called “Occupy Spirituality: A Radical Vision for a New Generation”. Adam presents Occupy Spirituality: Radical Aliveness for Changing the World in Vancouver April 10 & 11, 2015.  In this interview, he shares with the path of finding one’s calling. 

Interview conducted by Cameron Wenaus of Retreat.Guru and Sarah Lipton, Editor-in-Chief of the Shambhala Times. Interview transcribed by Emma Sartwell and edited by Christopher Schuman.

Finding one’s calling comes out of contemplative experience, which “for me,” Adam Bucko says, “is about essentially being in a state of receptivity and listening.” Contemplative practice has long been described as being about reaching a state of receptivity to what is – receptivity to the presence and activity of God in one’s life.” Continue reading Finding Your Calling ~ Interview with Adam Bucko

Foundational Stones Toward Mythtelling

by Martin Shaw 

via Earthlines Magazine

martin-shaw-photoMythologist and wilderness rites-of-passage guide Martin Shaw has been described by Robert Bly as “a true master” and as “one of the very greatest storytellers we have.” Author of the award-winning ‘A Branch From The Lightning Tree: ecstatic myth and the grace in wildness’, he leads the Oral Tradition: Myth, Folktale, and Fairy Tale programme at Stanford University in the U.S., and is visiting lecturer on Desmond Tutu’s leadership programme at Oxford University. Director of the Westcountry School of Myth on Dartmoor, he lived under canvas for four years to get a deeper sense of the pockets of the wild still contained in Great Britain. Martin Shaw presents Mythteller at Hollyhock May 22 – 27, 2015.

Foundational Stones Towards Mythtelling

1. The Wild Crucible of the Psyche

Continue reading Foundational Stones Toward Mythtelling

The Love Strategy: Metta in the Boardroom

feature photo courtesy of Dawn, Flickr Creative Commons

There are a lot of articles out there these days, including this one from the Huffington Post, which list the benefits of meditation – including reduced stress, improved concentration, greater happiness, slower aging… There is a story at Hollyhock about another benefit of meditation and how it helped to secure the Great Bear Rainforest from logging during the “War of the Woods”.

In the spirit of Valentine’s Day, Board Member Karen Mahon tells the story of The Love Strategy in this short video.

An Introduction to Tantra

Michaela Boehm presents The Yoga of Deep Intimacy in Vancouver September 25 – 27, 2015.

via Goop.com

tantra

photo by Mark Steinmetz. Stone Mountain, GA, 1994

AN INTRODUCTION TO TANTRA

Mention tantra, and you’ll probably get the response that having sex for seven hours sounds really unappealing—as mythologized by an off-hand Sting quote from 1990 that still dominates the entire conversation about this ancient practice. So, what exactly is tantra? We were surprised to find that it’s not actually about sex at all—or specifically, not at all about sexual technique. It’s really about the bedrock of intimacy—and re-establishing sexual polarity, or in laymen terms, sexual tension. As Michaela Boehm, who lectures and teaches seminars about the subject, explains, “Many of the couples who come to me have stopped having sex altogether—it’s really about the building the basics of intimacy, of opening our eyes.” More thoughts from Michaela below. Continue reading An Introduction to Tantra

I Resolve: Part Too…

This article is by Hollyhock Presenter Laurie Anderson and is a follow up article to I Resolve: Part One…
Feature photo – Mariano García-Gaspar

small-changes

As enrolment in fitness studios, weight loss clinics and quit-smoking programs spike in January, it’s useful to look at why many determined individuals drop out within a few weeks. A common reason is the “too” syndrome: too much, too soon, too often. For most of us, making huge changes quickly tends to backfire. The challenge seems too difficult, the “withdrawal” symptoms too painful, or the aches and pains from a sudden burst of exercise too much to handle. Continue reading I Resolve: Part Too…