All posts by Marketing Coordinator

Triple Twined Finish

By Marlene Liddle, who will be presenting Weaving from the Wild with Amy Robertson at Hollyhock on May 15-19, 2017.

No automatic alt text available.Marlene Liddle was born in Haida Gwaii and comes from a long line of artists, including Isabel and Charles Edenshaw.

Click on this photo for step by step instructions from Marlene on how to do a triple twined finish.

 

Check out some of Marlene’s inspiring work below!

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Marlene LiddleYou can see more at her Artist’s Page on Facebook.

Learn from Marlene at Hollyhock during Weaving from the Wild on May 15-19, 2017!

Register Now!

 

My Crow Self

By Shaena Lambert, who will be presenting Going Under the Words: Creating Fiction and Memoir at Hollyhock on June 2-7, 2017. This essay originally appeared in Quill and Quire, December, 2013, The Last Word, and was reprinted in The Huffington Post.

Margaret Atwood says in Negotiating with the Dead that writers are like jackdaws (a European crow): “We steal the shiny bits and build them into the structures of our own disorderly nests.” 

Collecting these shiny bits is an integral part of the fiction writer’s craft, but most writers, including me, are somewhat shamefaced and ambivalent about the process. What if these bits are woven out of other people’s secrets? Or pieces of skeleton from the family closet?  There’s an almost physical urge to use the material that speaks to you, especially once it starts to grow on its own, putting out twitching root hairs, but you don’t want to expose or hurt other people.

Nadine Gordimer’s famous solution was ‘to write as though everyone you know is dead.’ But few writers have the chutzpah to do this, or the moral certainty. For most writers, collecting material has a more secretive, illicit quality. It is gathered in the dark, kept under wraps, then released, with a mixture of pride and guilt, in what one hopes is a sufficiently transmogrified form.

Continue reading My Crow Self

Time of Transition

Atum O’Kane
Time of Transition
July 2-7, 2017

Spring Cleanse: A Journey of Renewal

Jocelan Coty
Spring Cleanse: A Journey of Renewal
May 10-14

A Buddhist Valentine

By Lama Surya Das, who will be presenting  Make Me One with Everything in Vancouver on Sept 24, 2017.

Valentine’s Day is one of my favorite American holidays. The fact
that this over-commercialized day falls around the same time as Tibetan New Year reminds me to make new year’s resolutions relating to my loved ones, and to renew my commitment to cultivating warm empathetic, altruistic compassion and unselfish goodness of heart, the very essence of authentic love. These resolutions usually involve opening my heart and mind; listening better; learning to forgive and love even those I don’t like; and coming to accept and bless the world, rather than fighting with it or trying to escape from it. Through co-meditating with everything, as it appears; through intermeditation and interbeing with it–rather than against or apart from “it”– I am learning to see thru the illusion of separateness. I also remember groups and individuals who may not feel included in this so-called lovers’ day in our country,  including single people and the LGBTQ+ communities. As Zen Master Dogen says: “To study the Buddha Way is to be intimate with all things.” This is true love.

What is true love? How would Buddha love? By seeing every single being, human and otherwise, as fundamentally like himself, and thus able to treat them and love them in the way he or she would be treated. We call this infinitely benevolent, selfless love the invaluable Bodhicitta or the Awakened Heart, the very spirit and soul of enlightenment. One can find this taught elegantly in the “Loving-kindness Sutra”; in Shantideva’s classic “The Way of the Bodhisattva“; in Atisha’s “Seven Points of Mind-Training & Attitude Transformation,” and in The Good Book.

Continue reading A Buddhist Valentine